How To Meditate For Beginners

In this post:

  • guided mindfulness meditation.
  • how to meditate for beginners.
  • close your eyes, listen and follow instructions.

Guided Meditation With Music

 

Guided Meditation Without Music

Summary Of Meditation For Beginners

  1. Sit and close your eyes.
  2. Pay attention to your breathing.
  3. When you notice your attention has wandered, bring it back to your breathing.
  4. Repeat for the allotted time.
  5. Remember that meditation is not forcing your mind to be clear, it’s just a process of training your mind to place attention on one thing. Eventually the mind becomes more clear, but if you just keep bringing attention back to your breath over and over, your are practicing meditation successfully.

For an initial consultation on learning to meditate or any other aspect of optimizing your health, click here to set a meeting.

Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

3 Things About Yoga That You May Not Know

  1. Breathing is primary.

Breathing is the most fundamental movement we do. We do it so much that we barely notice it. It is the one physiological function that happens automatically and involuntarily that we can also consciously control. We can change our breathing rate and depth voluntarily. How we breathe affects everything else we do.

In yoga, there are breathing techniques that energize as well as calm the body and mind. Every movement is coordinated with an inhale or an exhale. Even when sitting apparently motionless in a posture, there are subtle movements that occur with each breath, and the breathing is used as tool to get deeper into the posture physically and mentally.

Video Transcript:
One of the first things to remember with
yoga practice is that breathing is
primary. Yoga is primarily breathing
exercise, so that the depth we attain in
any given posture becomes irrelevant if
we stop breathing or if we stop paying
attention to the breath. So that's one of
the tools that we use in yoga to
cultivate intense present moment
awareness is attention to the breath. The
breath, breathing is the most fundamental
movement that we do even if we're
totally inactive the rest of the time. Or
the entire time for 24 hours even if
we're on bed rest, we're still breathing
all day every day, 24 hours a day, it's
the one movement that supports every
other movement that we perform. So it
makes sense to pay attention to it, tune
in to it. To cultivate the ability to
control it and to breathe better, more
effectively. You can also use the breath
as a way to stabilize our mood, emotions.
  1. It is ALL about the process.

The philosophical side of yoga teaches us to engage in the practice with a focus on the process and detachment from the outcomes. This does not mean we are careless or apathetic; it is merely a humble acceptance that many things are beyond our control. Our culture is very results-oriented and most of us learn very early to reach for, cling to, and grasp at the things we desire. Yoga teaches us to let go of our focus on the fruits of our efforts, and use that energy to fully engage in the process.

This is very liberating because the attitude and actions we take are within our control. Through yoga practice we become free of worry about the results and become more efficient in every action. Most of us have had some experience of being “in the zone” where we were totally immersed in what we were doing. Everything seemed effortless as if it was flowing through us.

Yoga is about practicing this approach to life on and off the mat. Modern sport and exercise psychology tells us that process-oriented individuals perform better more consistently than results oriented individuals, and ancient yogic philosophy agrees.

  1. Cobra and Upward Facing Dog are not the same.

Although they look similar, they are different. In cobra, the hips and thighs remain on the floor. The arms typically do not extend fully in this posture. In upward facing dog, the hips and thighs are lifted off of the floor. The arms are straight. In both postures the shoulders are kept maximum distance from the ears and the toes and feet are pointed with the tops of the toes resting on the mat.

Author: Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.

A Key To Health And Happiness

In this post:

  • a little know key for health and happiness


Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

Mind/Body Easy Exercise to Beat Stress

In this post:

  • a qigong based stress reducing exercise
  1.  Place your feet about shoulders width apart parallel with each other.
  2.  Let your shoulders relax away from your ears.
  3.  Place your hands in front of your abdomen with your palms facing your lower abdomen.
  4. With your elbows slightly bent, inhale through your nose as you lift your arms out to your sides and then up above your head.
  5. Exhale through pursed lips as you move your hands down to the starting position passing them in front of your body at about shoulders width.
  6. Repeat several time. Feel free to zone in on this movement for up to 5 minutes.

Click here to see video.
Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

How to Relax

In this post:

  • how to relax
  • use Herbert Benson’s “relaxation response”


Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretchIn this post:
therapy
.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

For a free coaching session, submit your info in the form below:

Breathing Exercise

In this post:


Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

For a free coaching session, submit your info in the form below:

Pareto Principle: Find More Time for Health and Fitness

In this post:


Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

For a free coaching session, submit your info in the form below:

ONE THING to Have More Time for Exercise

In this post:

  • why “to-do” lists can be a trap that kills productivity
  • how to optimize productivity in a given time period
  • the best question to ask when deciding what to do next


Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

For a free coaching session, submit your info in the form below:

Be Calm, Breathe Easy, and Enjoy Life More: #3 Remind yourself of the exorbitant price you pay for worry in terms of your health.

Want to beat the worry habit? Dale Carnegie’s advice in How to Stop Worrying and Start Living has been a game changer in my life.

One of his best suggestions is to remind yourself of the high cost we pay for our worry habits. In terms of spiritual, mental, physical, and emotional health, worry may be the biggest killer.

Usually labeled as stress or anxiety nowadays, the terminology has changed since Mr. Carnegie’s era. But the negative impact of this mental habit has probably grown as our lifestyles have become more rushed and hectic.

So reminding ourselves of the high cost of worry provides us with a strong reason why. This can give us strong motivation to practice the other worry-busting stress management principles Mr. Carnegie taught.

Here are some reminders:

1. Worry and stress will destroy your physical health. Many of our biggest health problems are stress-related. And even though some problems that are not directly caused by stress, every physical ailment tends to improve when worry and stress are reduced.

2. Worry will destroy your mental health. The future is essentially imaginary. A preoccupation with an imagined future is a big distraction from the reality of the present moment.  This plays a big  part in many manifestations of mental illness.

3. Worrying about the future brings up the emotion of fear, which is the cause of the stress response in the body. When fear is the dominate emotion we experience, our emotional health is greatly compromised.

4. Worry is a barrier to your spiritual development. Great masters from many spiritual and religious traditions spoke out against the negative effect of worry. Jesus and Buddha are two of the most notable proponents of anti-worry.

If you want some actionable steps to defeat the mental habit of worry then check out these other 2 articles:

#1 Live In Day-Tight Compartments

#2 Use The Magic Formula

Author: Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.

How to Measure Your Level of Stress

Heart Rate Variability is a way to measure the impact of all the various life stresses on our bodies.  Because the central nervous system governs the heart rate, precise monitoring and measurement tells us how stressed the body is.


Modern smart phones and heart rate monitors make it possible to measure heart rate variability yourself. There are several apps available. Here is the one I use.

Each morning after measuring, it gives you a readout like this:

IMG_0685

Or this:

IMG_0686

Based on this reading I can tell whether to go hard or focus on stimulating the relaxation response that day.

Source:

Know When You’re Good to Go

Author:
Author: Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.