Dynamic Mobility Warm Up Routine

In this post:

  • a complete dynamic mobility warm up routine for any workout or training session.
Video Transcript:
Hey it's Nick Ortego here. I'm gonna
take you through a complete body dynamic
mobility warm-up routine. This can be
used before a workout or a run to get
your body ready. I'm a big fan of doing
mobility work for the warm up. When
you're constantly moving, you get your
heart rate up you get your body heat up
We're also moving joints to their full
range of motion and providing a little
bit of flexibility work before a workout.
Not a big fan of static stretching
before a workout. Tends to undermine your
power output so dynamic mobility is
where it's at as far as I'm concerned. We're
gonna start off with four drills where
you're basically just walking back and
forth.
The first one is knee to chest. Basically
walk when you take one knee, opposite
hand and pull that knee up. Boom here. So
the reason I like to use the opposite
hand is because it replicates natural
movement pattern. It gets me extending
one hip and extending the opposite
shoulder. Gets me flexing one shoulder
and flexing the opposite hip, just like
you do when you're walking or running. So
you can do a certain count here like 20.
10 or 20 each side or you can just go for a
certain distance. This one is really good
if you're actually going for a walk or a
run, you can just work it into your
bipedal locomotion. So knee to chest. Next
one is heel to butt. Here I want to be
sure you can grab your ankle. Pull this
knee back. When you pull that knee back,
activate the glute, boom. That's a key part
of it. Stretching the quad. Activating the glute, knee back, knee back. Same as the
previous drill. 10 each side, 20 each
side. Or just a certain distance. The
next one is the heel crossover. So you
want to be sure here that you're
bringing the knee up and rotating the
hip to get the foot to the hand. I don't
want to be bending my spine to reach
down to my foot. This is not what it's
supposed to look like. It's supposed to
look like this: torso stays upright, the
hands just reach down, and the foot comes
up to the hand. The hand doesn't go down
to the foot. Same as the previous drill -
10 or 20 reps each side or a certain
distance. The next one is the gorilla
walk and on this one I step forward, hinge at
the hips, reach down and touch the ground.
I may not be able to reach the ground if
my hamstrings are really tight. In that
case you just reach and tap your shin.
Hip hinge not spine rounding. Same as the
previous 10 or 20 reps each side. Be sure
you come up tall at the top, finish the
motion. Bend forward, come up tall
When I come up tall and bring this other
foot forward I'm getting a little bit of
mobility here in these hip flexors. Those
are the four traveling drills. Next
couple are basically just finding a wall,
or something that you can hold
one hand onto. You could potentially do
these drills without holding on if your
balance is good enough, but I like to
hold on because it lets me get a little
bit of velocity and power into these range
of motion
dynamic mobility drills. So grab a fence,
pole, or wall with one hand. So if I'm
holding with my right hand I'm gonna
swing my right leg. I like to do about 15
on each side. You can see that my arm, my
opposite arm, swings with it. What I'm
trying to do is swing the leg back as
far as I can and forward as far as I
can. What I want to try to do as well is
not let my leg wag my torso. So I don't
want to be doing this. If my torso is
moving in order to get my leg higher,
that's too much. What I want to do is
hold the torso upright, relatively stable.
There may be a little bit of rotating and
movement going on, but I'm not letting it
deviate from vertical. And it looks like
this. And on the other side left hand on
the fence or wall, or pole. Left leg
swings. And again you can see if I overdo
it my torso starts swinging around. I
don't want to do that. I'll keep the
torso relatively upright and swing the
leg. Next is the side leg swing. It's pretty
much the same thing except I'm going to
be swinging my legs out to the side. So
if my left foot's on the ground. My right
hand goes on the wall, pole, or fence. And
the key here is that I'm emphasizing the
lateral swing. The stance leg firing up
the glute. There is a little bit of the
tilt in the pelvis when I do this. I'm
trying to get that leg as far out as I
can. I'm letting gravity take care of the
medial swing. my leg comes across the
body. I'm not trying to get farther up
here.
Don't really have too much motion in the
hip there. I'm just letting gravity and
momentum take it that way. So it looks
like this, and once again ten to fifteen
each side.
I like 15. When the right foot is on the
ground I'm swinging my left leg, my left
hand on avstable object. There you go. That's
the lower body portion. So for the upper
body, I like to do this flye exercise.
Where left goes over right, and right
goes over left. One thing that I like to
emphasize is that when my arms come
across the body my thumbs turn this way.
As I go out I'm turning the thumbs back.
That's engaging the external rotators at
the shoulder, the retractors at the
shoulder blades. So we're activating
those muscles that tend to lie dormant
and we're stretching, dynamically
stretching, the muscles that tend to be
tight for most people, the pecs. Thumbs go
in and thumbs go out. and I use momentum
here in a controlling way. Thumbs out.
Comes in, comes out. I like to do about
twenty to thirty of these. Once I've done
those I go into arm circles, really big
high range of motion arm circles like
this. I create a little bit of momentum
so I go with 20 forward and 20 backwards.
Give that a try and if you got any
benefit from this video, then leave a
comment below. If you'd like to get more
content not available on the blog or the
regular YouTube channel, then click the
link connected to this video, you'll
have a chance to sign up for the Run
Better Now VIP club.

Author:
Nick Ortego is a health coach specializing in biohacking for runners. He integrates modern methods with the ancient wisdom of yoga to help runners get the most out of every aspect of life. He is the owner of N 2 Action, a wellness studio in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, offering personal training, health coaching, yoga, and fascial stretch therapy.
Also find more on the Nick Ortego Fitness YouTube Channel

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s